Daniel Silverstein is a New York based clothing designer and manufacturer of zero waste apparel.

His namesake label has been seen in boutiques and specialty stores around the world. Entertainers such as Kristen Bell, Jennifer Hudson, Amber Valletta, Yael Stone, Alysia Reiner, Lauren Singer, Ariana & the Rose, Yolanda Ross, Marci Zaroff and more have been seen at red carpet events and on magazine covers across the US and England in Daniel’s collection. 

In 2016 Daniel embarked on a new journey with the creation of ZWD.


"I'm trying to do something big, and I need a  lot of help. 
The idea of ZWD is pretty simple, but the purpose is huge.  

In 2017 we are attempting to save 3 tons of pre consumer textile waste. That's enough to make roughly 6,000 ZWD pieces. We plan to use my unique process to turn trash into treasure. We will process and track waste to analyze market potential for this process and prove that zero waste design has more triple bottom line returns to the fashion industry than conventional fashion.

ZWD will create a closed loop option for the apparel industry to aid in ending the catastrophic pollution that plagues our earth and tarnishes our reputation as designers and as people.  This process will create jobs as well as a workforce training program for the future innovators of zero waste design that we so desperately need to encourage as we think about the future of our planet.

Please consider ZWD as you think about how
you would like to dress in the future."

-daniel
 

After starting his collection in 2010, Daniel gained the attention of both the buyers and the audience on season 2 of the NBC reality competition, Fashion Star in Spring, 2013.  

Daniel Silverstein has given numerous interviews and lectures about his Zero Waste Design techniques. He has appeared in Driving Fashion Forward with Amber Valletta, and on MSNBC Shift and ABC News 7, Silverstein is committed to promoting responsible consumption by the fashion industry while demanding quality designs and products.  

Interested in helping make social and environmental change in the fashion industry, Daniel has donated his time and pieces from his collection to help raise funds for Dress for Success and Jersey Battered Women's Service, volunteered at The Fashion Industry of Technology as a guest critic offering advice and internships to aspiring designers and mentoring them in a zero waste environment. Additionally, Daniel offers a series of Zero Waste Design workshops and lectures, for more information click here.   Daniel is also the proud designer of Coeio products developing zero waste pieces for Jae Rhim Lee & Mike Ma's brilliant vision for the future of green burials. See the world famous Ted Talk here

about zero waste

Textile pollution is a growing problem in the fashion industry.  The Council for Textile Recycling says that more than 70 pounds of textiles per US Citizen are going in to landfills annually, that means over 21 BILLION pounds this year alone. At Daniel's studio, fabric waste is kept to zero. Pattern making techniques, appliqués, tiled mosaics and embellishments absorb one hundred percent of the textile goods that are brought into the studio and ZWD takes factory scraps and turns them into new goods. 

Daniel has mastered the process of large and small scale production without textile byproducts being brought to landfill, a process he is now bringing to projects for Manufacture New York, relocating his studio to the Sunset Park hub and offering consult to a variety of their client's domestic manufacturing projects. If you are interested in having your company's designs be made zero waste and produced in the USA, please contact us here


Zero waste is the goal of both the garments and the studio. We use recycled and recyclable materials in our shipping, packaging and office materials as well as a zero waste mindset in every day company life, eliminating trash wherever possible. We are constantly improving the process remaining conscious and aware of places to make change. 

For information you can use about collecting, processing or recycling your own textile waste, visit The United States Environmental Protection Agency